A retrospective look at the operator/UAS ratio and its implications

Come see us at the AUVSI conference November 2015 in Tel-Aviv.

abstract for AUVSI

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Can child-pedestrians’ hazard perception skills be enhanced?

Here is a fresh publication on Child pedestrians. We introduce here, for the first time, the Child-pedestrians Anticipate and Act Hazard Perception Training (CA2HPT), which is based on the same principles as our Act and Anticipate Hazard Perception Training (AAHPT) for young novice drivers.

Meir Anat, Oron-Gilad Tal and Yisrael Parmet (2015). Can child-pedestrians’ hazard perception skills be enhanced?Accident Analysis and Prevention 83 101–110.

Highlights

  • Hazard perception (HP) is the ability to read the road and anticipate future events.
  • 7–9-Year-olds’ HP skills were trained in a simulated dome projection environment.
  • Training utilized a conceptually innovative approach taken from the driving HP domain.
  • Trainees were found to be more aware of potential hazards related to restricted field of view relative to control
  • Child-pedestrians are responsive to training and actively detecting materialized hazards may enrich their ability to cross roads.

Abstract

Objective: Traffic collisions yield a substantial rate of morbidity and injury among child-pedestrians. We explored the formation of an innovative hazard perception training intervention – Child-pedestrians Anticipate and Act Hazard Perception Training (CA2HPT). Training was based upon enhancing participants’ ability to anticipate potential hazards by exposing them to an array of traffic scenes viewed from different angles.

Method: Twenty-four 7–9-year-olds have participated. Trainees underwent a 40-min intervention of observing typical residentialtraffic scenarios ina simulated dome projectionenvironment while engaging in a hazard detection task. Trainees were encouraged to note differences between the scenarios presented to them from separate angles (a pedestrian’s point-of-view and a higher perspective angle). Next,trainees and control group members were required to perform crossing decision tasks.

Results: Trainees were found to be more aware of potential hazards related to restricted field of view relative to control.

Conclusions: Child pedestrians are responsive to training and actively detecting materialized hazards may enrich child-pedestrians’ ability to cross roads.

An example of an CAAHPT intervention scenario

An example of an CAAHPT intervention scenario. (1) taken from a child-pedestrian’s POV (above) and (2) taken from a higher, less restricting angle (below). Note that in the dome facility, participants saw one perfect continuous image but here in the figure, the images are shown as three overlapping screens. White rectangle is given only for emphasis; not

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Are child-pedestrians able to identify hazardous traffic situations?

One more publication within the child pedestrian’s realm of road crossing co-authored by Anat Meir and Yisrael Parmet published in  Safety Science, Vol. 80, pages 33-40 (2015)

Are Child pedestrians able to identify hazardous traffic situations?

Highlights

we explored child-pedestrians’ HP skills employing hazard detection task in virtual settings (our Dome lab). We used the same approach that we have used previously in the driving HP domain to study novice drivers. As pedestrians’ age increased their awareness toward potential hazards increased.  7–9-year-olds reported less instances of FOV obscured by parked vehicles. 7–9-year-olds lingered more in identifying instances of FOV obscured by parked vehicles.

Abstract

Background. Child-pedestrians are more prone to fail in identifying hazardous situations. Aiming to better understand the development of hazard-perception abilities in dynamic road situations we examined participants’ hazard detection abilities in a virtual environment.

Method.  Experienced-adult participants and child-pedestrians observed typical road crossing related scenarios from a pedestrian’s point of view and engaged in a hazard detection task.

Results. Consistent with our hypotheses, less instances of obscured field of view by parked vehicles were reported as hazardous by 7–9-year-olds, who were also prone to linger more in identifying situations depicting field of view partially obscured by parked vehicles compared to all other age groups. Reports of obscured field of view by road curvature as hazardous increased with age.

Conclusions. Understanding child-pedestrians’ shortcomings in evaluating traffic situations contribute to the effort of producing intervention techniques which may increase their attentiveness toward potential hazards and lead toward reduction in their over-involvement in crashes.

Pedestrians' crossing scenarios

Traffic scenes for pedestrian crossing (only the left part of the scene is shown). Top: no moving elements, Mid: road curvature obscuring FOV, Bottom: Parked vehicles obscuring FOV.

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What do we think we are doing: principles of coupled self-regulation in human-robot interaction (…

The use of domestic service robots is becoming widespread. While in industrial settings robots are often used for specified tasks, the challenge in the case of robots put to domestic use is to affo…

via What do we think we are doing: principles of coupled self-regulation in human-robot interaction (….

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Human factors engineering consideration in the design of display devices for dismounted soldiers

In January 2015, the Gordon Center for Systems Engineering at the Technion conducted its Annual meeting. This year the meeting was dedicated to Human Factors and how it is relevant to system design.

During this day, lectures focused on the importance of integrating human factors into systems design. Two communities: human factors practitioners and researchers and system engineers from leading Industries in Israel had the opportunity to interact and learn. Clearly there is a need for better integration of the human factors engineering discipline in product and project development Read the rest of this entry »

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Two upcoming meetings in Israel: Israeli Ergonomics Association and IsraHCI

Please note the upcoming Israeli Ergonomics Association meeting focusing on healthcare 16/2/2015

http://www.ergonomics-israel.org/

 

IsraHCI 3rd annual research meeting will be held in Micorsoft R&D center in Herzlia on the 18/2/2015. Our guest keynote speaker will be  Prof. Jody Forlizzi  from Carnegie Melon.

Registration is now open but space is limited

http://www.israhci.org/

 

 

 

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Dr. Adi Ronen is no longer with us

Adi Ronen Dr. Adi Ronen, a friend and a colleague passed away on July 30, 2014. He was only 42 years old. Adi was a Human Physiologist  and specialized in Human performance and Human Factors. He focused on studying various aspects of work under physiological limitations; looking at how physiological, performance and subjective feeling changes occur while performing  tasks,  and how technology or various substances (e.g., THC, alcohol) play a role in those changes. Adi was one of the initiators of the BGU IRB committee  and a devoted member. Ensuring ethics in research was one of his passions.  Adi was also a gifted lecturer continuously receiving the  Teaching excellence award in the Faculty of Engineering Sciences.   Adi left behind a wife and three children. He will be missed.

Photo courtesy of Dani Mechlis, BGU photographer.

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