Posts Tagged Human-Robot Interaction

BGU is seeking PhD and postdoctoral students for advanced research in multidisciplinary robotics

ABC Robotics Center (Agricultural, Biological and Cognitive Robotics) at BGU is  seeking outstanding students for advanced research in multidisciplinary robotics

All applicants must be skilled in both oral and written communication in English and be able to work independently as well as in collaboration with others.

PhD applicants must have completed an MSc degree in Engineering, Natural Sciences, Computer Sciences or Psychology with a thesis. Experience in artificial intelligence, robotics, cognitive science and programming is an advantage. The application should include a CV, a list of academic grades, a copy of degree project report, a list of publications, three personal references (one from the MSc thesis advisor) and one A4 page describing the personal motivation for applying for this position. Ph.D. candidates must submit a research proposal and pass a qualification exam on their research proposal within the first year of the PhD studies. The PhD thesis should be completed within a 4-year timeframe. The ABC Robotics Ph.D. Scholarship covers tuition fees and a monthly stipend. The candidate will receive a minimum of 6,930 NIS per month for a duration of 4 years.

The ABC Robotics Postdoc Scholarship is 10,116 NIS per month for a duration of 2 years.

Additional requirements and details may be found at: http://in.bgu.ac.il/en/kreitman_school/Pages/admission.aspx

Applicants should send all necessary registration information to Ms. Sima Koram, email: simagel@exchange.bgu.ac.il as indicated in

http://aristo4bgu.bgu.ac.il/PhdEnglishApplication/PhdApplicationForm/

and send a copy of their application to: abc-robotics@bgu.ac.il

 ******     Specific research topics are proposed at: www.bgu.ac.il/abc-robotics

Closing date for applications: 30 May 2014 or until all positions are filled. Candidates applying by above closing date will be informed by July 2014.

Starting date: 1 October 2014 or earlier

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Human-Robot Interaction (HRI) in future military operations – The book

For those of you who are interested in the role of Human-Robot Interaction (HRI) in future military operations, Mike Barnes and Florian Jencth have recently edited a handbook titled “Human-Robot Interactions in Future Military Operations“. The book is a collection of chapters written by well recognized researchers in the area. It provides a wide range of topics from operators interacting with small ground robots and aerial vehicles to supervising large, near-autonomous vehicles capable of intelligent battlefield behaviors.

I was honored to contribute a chapter to this book. Together with my colleague and former student Yaniv Minkov we discuss the issue of “Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) from the bottom-up operational perspective“.

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Robotic Displays For Dismounted Warfighters: A Field Study

Here is the abstract of one of my latest studies. It appears in a special issue of JCEDM “Improving Human-Robot Interaction in Complex Operational Environments: Translating Theory into Practice”

* Oron-Gilad, T., Redden, E.S. and Minkov, Y. (2011). Robotic Displays for Dismounted Warfighter Situation Awareness of Remote Locations: A field study, Journal of Cognitive Ergonomics and Decision Making. Accepted November 2010.Volume 5, Number 1, March 2011, pp. 29–54.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1555343411399076
This study investigated scalability of unmanned vehicle displays for dismounted warfighters. Task performance, workload and preferences for three display devices were examined in two operational settings: tele-operation of an unmanned ground vehicle and intelligence gathering from a remote unmanned vehicle. Previous research has demonstrated variability in operational needs with regard to active tele-operation versus passive intelligence gathering. Thus, it was important to identify whether there was actually a dichotomy between the two in terms of screen space requirements and whether this difference stems from task differences or other factors.  Thirty-one soldiers participated in a field study at Ft. Benning, GA. They were required to perform tele-operation and intelligence gathering tasks. Results reconfirmed our hypothesis that display type influences performance in intelligence-related tasks that require the use of video feed and digital map. No significant differences among display types were found in the UGV tele-operation task. In conclusion, dismounted warfighters can adequately perform both active and passive duties with a hand held device where the video window is as small as 4.3 inches in diameter. However, monocular HMDs for robotic displays can be problematic and should be carefully assessed before use in dismounted warfighters missions.

Display devices used in the study

Display devices used in the study

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