Archive for category unmanned aerial systems

Supervising and controlling unmanned systems: A multi-phase study with subject matter experts

At last, a new publication in frontiers in Psyhcology co authored with Talya Porat, Michal Rottem-Hovev and  Jacob Silbiger (Synergy Integration).

This research is related to Macrocognition: The Science and Engineering of Sociotechnical Work Systems

In this article we conduct a retrospective examination of studies concerned with man-UAS ratio, i.e., how many systems should a single operator control, should a team share (multiple operator – multiple UASs; MOMU).

MOMU

Mutiple operator -Multiple UAS – MOMU simulated environment

Abstract

Proliferation in the use of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs) in civil and military operations has presented a multitude of human factors challenges; from how to bridge the gap between demand and availability of trained operators, to how to organize and present data in meaningful ways. Utilizing the Design Research Methodology (DRM), a series of closely related studies with subject matter experts (SMEs) demonstrate how the focus of research gradually shifted from “how many systems can a single operator control” to “how to distribute missions among operators and systems in an efficient way”. The first set of studies aimed to explore the modal number, i.e., how many systems can a single operator supervise and control. It was found that an experienced operator can supervise up to 15 UASs efficiently using moderate levels of automation, and control (mission and payload management) up to 3 systems. Once this limit was reached, a single operator’s performance was compared to a team controlling the same number of systems. In general, teams led to better performances. Hence, shifting design efforts towards developing tools that support teamwork environments of multiple operators with multiple UASs (MOMU). In MOMU settings, when the tasks are similar or when areas of interest overlap, one operator seems to have an advantage over a team who needs to collaborate and coordinate. However, in all other cases, a team was advantageous over a single operator.

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A retrospective look at the operator/UAS ratio and its implications

Come see us at the AUVSI conference November 2015 in Tel-Aviv.

abstract for AUVSI

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