Archive for category Hazard perception; Traffic crashes; Children; Educational intervention; Skills; Road crossing

Child Pedestrians’ perceived risk of the crossing place

We are excited to present our studies in the 10th University Transportation Centers Spotlight Conference on Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety to be held December 1-2 ,2016 in the Keck Center, Washington DC.

Here is a link to a short description of the BGU pedestrian laboratory.pedestrian-lab-brochure and to a short brief about the work we are presenting (Child Pedestrians’ perceived risk of the crossing place).

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Cell phone conversations and child pedestrian’s crossing behavior; a simulator study

This is our most recent publication, accepted for publication in Safety Science.

Please cite this article in press as: Tapiro, H., et al. Cell phone conversations and child pedestrian’s crossing behavior; a simulator study. Safety Sci. (2016), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ssci.2016.05.013

Cell phone conversations and child pedestrian’s crossing behavior; a simulator study

Hagai Tapiro, Yisrael Parmet and Tal Oron-Gilad

Abstract

Child pedestrians are highly represented in fatal and severe road crashes and differ in their crossing behavior from adults. Although many children carry cell phones, the effect that cell phone conversations have on children’s crossing behavior has not been thoroughly examined. A comparison of children and adult pedestrians’ crossing behavior while engaged in cell phone conversations was conducted. In a semi-immersive virtual environment simulating a typical city, 14 adults and 38 children (11 children aged 7-8; 18 aged 9-10 and 9 aged 11-13), experienced road crossing related traffic-scene scenarios. They were requested to press a response button whenever they felt it was safe to cross. Eye movements were tracked. Results have shown that all age groups’ crossing behaviors were affected by cell phone conversations. When busy with more cognitively demanding conversation types, participants were slower to react to a crossing opportunity, chose smaller crossing gaps, and allocated less visual attention to the peripheral regions of the scene. The ability to make better crossing decisions improved with age, but no interaction with cell phone conversation type was found. The most prominent improvement was shown in ‘safety gap’; each age group maintained a longer gap than its predecessor younger age group. In accordance to the current study, it is safe to say that cell phone conversations can hinder child and adult pedestrians’ safety. Thereby, it is important to take those findings in account when aiming to train young pedestrians for road-safety and increase public awareness.

Interested in seeing an interactive visualization app of our data?https://eyemove.shinyapps.io/cell-phone/

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Interactive app to view the eye gaze data. Click on the link and follow the instructions shown above.

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Validation study: Dome Pedestrian Simulator

Abstract

Here we report upon results of a validation study conducted on our unique pedestrian simulator.

 

The simulator validation study confirms the simulator’s ability to correctly simulate the real road environment, and strengthens the reliability as a source for statistical Inference. The goal of this work was to investigate whether the Dome simulator successfully simulates typical pedestrian environment in a manner that will elicit people to act in the same manner as they would in the real world crossing situations. Data analysis shows that the simulator delivers more reliable results concerning speeds rather than distances. Questionnaires analyses show that the simulator’s faith to reality regarding the display, sound effect and perspective is medium.

dome-tapiro-and-oron-gilad

 

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Can child-pedestrians’ hazard perception skills be enhanced?

Here is a fresh publication on Child pedestrians. We introduce here, for the first time, the Child-pedestrians Anticipate and Act Hazard Perception Training (CA2HPT), which is based on the same principles as our Act and Anticipate Hazard Perception Training (AAHPT) for young novice drivers.

Meir Anat, Oron-Gilad Tal and Yisrael Parmet (2015). Can child-pedestrians’ hazard perception skills be enhanced?Accident Analysis and Prevention 83 101–110.

Highlights

  • Hazard perception (HP) is the ability to read the road and anticipate future events.
  • 7–9-Year-olds’ HP skills were trained in a simulated dome projection environment.
  • Training utilized a conceptually innovative approach taken from the driving HP domain.
  • Trainees were found to be more aware of potential hazards related to restricted field of view relative to control
  • Child-pedestrians are responsive to training and actively detecting materialized hazards may enrich their ability to cross roads.

Abstract

Objective: Traffic collisions yield a substantial rate of morbidity and injury among child-pedestrians. We explored the formation of an innovative hazard perception training intervention – Child-pedestrians Anticipate and Act Hazard Perception Training (CA2HPT). Training was based upon enhancing participants’ ability to anticipate potential hazards by exposing them to an array of traffic scenes viewed from different angles.

Method: Twenty-four 7–9-year-olds have participated. Trainees underwent a 40-min intervention of observing typical residentialtraffic scenarios ina simulated dome projectionenvironment while engaging in a hazard detection task. Trainees were encouraged to note differences between the scenarios presented to them from separate angles (a pedestrian’s point-of-view and a higher perspective angle). Next,trainees and control group members were required to perform crossing decision tasks.

Results: Trainees were found to be more aware of potential hazards related to restricted field of view relative to control.

Conclusions: Child pedestrians are responsive to training and actively detecting materialized hazards may enrich child-pedestrians’ ability to cross roads.

An example of an CAAHPT intervention scenario

An example of an CAAHPT intervention scenario. (1) taken from a child-pedestrian’s POV (above) and (2) taken from a higher, less restricting angle (below). Note that in the dome facility, participants saw one perfect continuous image but here in the figure, the images are shown as three overlapping screens. White rectangle is given only for emphasis; not

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